11 4 / 2014

Expo - Michael Bierhup
At the Expo there was this experimental video game called Moli. It did away with all conventional gameplay and focused instead of the character in the world. This gives you the added experience of being more immersed in the world of the game. You actually feel the character move, as there are no add ons like jump or duck you just move, and go along with the motion of the game. Such a technology could be used for theme park attractions as alterntate to virtual reality (which makes one feel dizzy) and give guests a better sense of were they are going

Expo - Michael Bierhup

At the Expo there was this experimental video game called Moli. It did away with all conventional gameplay and focused instead of the character in the world. This gives you the added experience of being more immersed in the world of the game. You actually feel the character move, as there are no add ons like jump or duck you just move, and go along with the motion of the game. Such a technology could be used for theme park attractions as alterntate to virtual reality (which makes one feel dizzy) and give guests a better sense of were they are going

randomnessoffiction

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11 4 / 2014

While I was walking through the expo I was struck by how dimensional this entry was, so I stopped.  It was only after having stopped for a few seconds that I realized what this entry originated from.  I have seen The 39 Steps twice, one in London and once, very recently, here at Ohio University.  They were both wonderful performances and I could honestly not rate one above the other. In this booth, a student who helped design the stage was showing her techniques, thought process, and telling some pretty exciting stories of what all happened in the making of OU’s 39 Steps. This booth was not only vert detailed, with the miniature scaled stage, props, pictures, and detailed information, but it also was able to bring me back to the feelings I had during the show, making my experience with it in the expo immersive.

Rachel Lewis

rlewis223

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11 4 / 2014

This entry into the student expo is a series of mallet and percussion instruments made completely by hand which the builder’s will use to perform at their senior recital. I believe the instruments featured are a vibraphone with a rotter, bells, a xylophone, and string instruments of some kind, probably a cello, bass, or something. I think this is very innovative because it follows the do it yourself trend that is revolutionizing a lot of industries here in the United States and the instruments were built with materials that were either recycled or available at any hardware store so anyone can do the same thing themselves with the right amount of research and motivation. Not only is it innovative it is very immersive because audiences can experience the performance from the musicians and the music produced by the instruments, and while at the student expo I had quite a few other contestants mention this entry so it was very popular along with being a great research project.

akitae157

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10 4 / 2014

2014 Student Expo

I was not only blown away with the amount of digital media groups presenting at the expo this year, but thought their work was outstanding. One presentation I really enjoyed was of a video game currently being developed called Life Less. I was very impressed by the amount of detail already accomplished in the three short months they have been working on the project. One aspect that I thought was done very well was the rain, which they explained during the presentation was being created by a particle effect placed overhead set to follow the camera’s movement. They also explained different things regarding the audio throughout the game, such as how you begin to hear different sounds when passing different trees. This was created using different audio radiuses (that may not be the correct terminology, but it was something close to that!).

Life Less truly combines numerous aspects of the immersive world. From the story the game tells, to the way players interact, to the actual look and feel of the virtual world being portrayed by the game, I felt this was a great example of where the creativity industry is heading. 

-Joey Buccini

2014 Student Expo

I was not only blown away with the amount of digital media groups presenting at the expo this year, but thought their work was outstanding. One presentation I really enjoyed was of a video game currently being developed called Life Less. I was very impressed by the amount of detail already accomplished in the three short months they have been working on the project. One aspect that I thought was done very well was the rain, which they explained during the presentation was being created by a particle effect placed overhead set to follow the camera’s movement. They also explained different things regarding the audio throughout the game, such as how you begin to hear different sounds when passing different trees. This was created using different audio radiuses (that may not be the correct terminology, but it was something close to that!).

Life Less truly combines numerous aspects of the immersive world. From the story the game tells, to the way players interact, to the actual look and feel of the virtual world being portrayed by the game, I felt this was a great example of where the creativity industry is heading.

-Joey Buccini

jbuccini

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10 4 / 2014

The presentation I found interesting was a game design presentation in the media arts section called Max Impulse.  I am by no means a gamer and have never really been a gamer.  I find working controllers confusing and hard to work.  When I approached the presentation I immediately was told I needed to play the game. I liked the simplicity of it as well as the overall look.  Matt took time to explain the back story to me which I got lost about a minute into his explanation.  The full immersion of the game is what made me like it I could tell the team put in a lot of work to make the look and sound fit the world they created.  They also designed a simple game to play that was geared to everyone even people like me who are not considered gamers.
-Lindsay Hatcher

The presentation I found interesting was a game design presentation in the media arts section called Max Impulse.  I am by no means a gamer and have never really been a gamer.  I find working controllers confusing and hard to work.  When I approached the presentation I immediately was told I needed to play the game. I liked the simplicity of it as well as the overall look.  Matt took time to explain the back story to me which I got lost about a minute into his explanation.  The full immersion of the game is what made me like it I could tell the team put in a lot of work to make the look and sound fit the world they created.  They also designed a simple game to play that was geared to everyone even people like me who are not considered gamers.

-Lindsay Hatcher

lindsh93

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10 4 / 2014

This display (by Taylor Reinhart) discussed standup comedy in relation to the modern personal essay. I think that it has a lot to do with immersive worlds because both standup comedians and essayists create worlds that are inhabited by characters that they also create. Louis CK is a master if this in his show, Louie. Not only does he create a believable world, but also a world whose uncomfortable situations are so real that the audience can feel like that are experiencing them with him.

-Joe Skyrm

This display (by Taylor Reinhart) discussed standup comedy in relation to the modern personal essay. I think that it has a lot to do with immersive worlds because both standup comedians and essayists create worlds that are inhabited by characters that they also create. Louis CK is a master if this in his show, Louie. Not only does he create a believable world, but also a world whose uncomfortable situations are so real that the audience can feel like that are experiencing them with him.

-Joe Skyrm

joeskyrm

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10 4 / 2014

A space that attempts to create an immersive of space in order to tell a story as authentic as possible is the theater.  MFA design student Emmy Weldon runs the paint shop and crew for the School of Theater and her models and designs were displayed at the expo. The models are to scale and are replicas of the reproduced performance stage.  The theater is an incredible place to create story elements to immerse an audience into a believable story using color, costume, lighting, props, voice and music.  In set design, there is almost a rule that the best painting and design techniques and tools go the least noticed.  Everything should blend and fit so well together with the story and the characters that the audience does not necessarily notice the scenery because it simply is.  In the same way, immersion of an audience member into the theater connects the patron to the story, the characters, and the overall entire world of the play into some sort of reality to portray truths that otherwise could not be expressed or suggested.  
-Megan Normansell

A space that attempts to create an immersive of space in order to tell a story as authentic as possible is the theater.  MFA design student Emmy Weldon runs the paint shop and crew for the School of Theater and her models and designs were displayed at the expo. The models are to scale and are replicas of the reproduced performance stage.  The theater is an incredible place to create story elements to immerse an audience into a believable story using color, costume, lighting, props, voice and music.  In set design, there is almost a rule that the best painting and design techniques and tools go the least noticed.  Everything should blend and fit so well together with the story and the characters that the audience does not necessarily notice the scenery because it simply is.  In the same way, immersion of an audience member into the theater connects the patron to the story, the characters, and the overall entire world of the play into some sort of reality to portray truths that otherwise could not be expressed or suggested.  

-Megan Normansell

megnorms

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10 4 / 2014

Student Expo - Jacob Forni

I saw some very interesting projects at the expo but none caught my eye more than Mori. Mori is a game that was described to me to be more of an interactive experience than just a game. I was told that everything has meaning in the game. Similar in a way to how everything in Alice in Wonderland has meaning, which I found particularly interesting. While playing it felt like everything was tied to the music and I couldn’t help but to be drawn into the world. The colors, music, cinematography, everything comes together to help bring out specific emotions that are tied to the specific area and I feel like its hard not to be drawn into it. 

fornicusrex

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10 4 / 2014

After doing some research, I decided to go back to a place that was near and dear to my heart. I must have visited this restaurant two times a year when I was younger and it was still open. It’s called Mars 2112. It is a themed restaurant in New York City based around future space travel. If it were still open today it would probably be considered outdated due to new technology but when I was younger it was a genius immersive environment of its time! In order to enter the restaurant you had to walk down into a sunken courtyard of sorts and get into a spaceship which included a 4D type ride. The ride moved and there was 3D graphics playing before your eyes. After the ride, you ended up on Mars which was the dining area. It was decked out in Mars themed decorations from top to bottom. There were aliens and all the waiters were dressed in futuristic costumes. The food was themed and named to fit into the Mars theme. after your meal, you had to pass through a “teleporter” which located you back on Earth. It also placed you into the gift shop which was smart because after the experience, everyone wanted something to bring home! I always walked home with something new because I loved that place so much. Unfortunately, it closed in 2012 for reasons that are unknown to the public.

ariellebusch

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10 4 / 2014

I talked to a girl that was over in the theater area. She was a theater production major and showed me a chandelier that she and a few other people worked on for the production “As You Like It.” The frame for the prop was designed by the prop crew and then lit with track lighting to transform it into a chandelier. Then she and her cohorts used straw from grass skirts and other textures and paint to take a skeletal frame work that sort of looked like a tree and transformed it with layer upon layer of texture.  It was innovative because she brought different elements together to create a realistic tree that looked like it was very old and grew over time. It created immersion by giving the audience of the show a main focus that was not just an ornate chandelier but something that was related to the story. It was used as a source of light and interest on stage.

 

semper--ad--meliora

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10 4 / 2014

Gretchen Kessler One of the most successful (albeit kinda weirdest) immersive spaces I’ve experienced was this café just down the street from our hostel in Quito, Ecuador. It was called he “LOLCAFE,” and it was completely themed around popular internet memes. The menu was covered with all the memes they could possibly think of, and it was like looking into the heart of American youth, although we were in the middle of South America. While I never actually ate at the LOLCAFE, I did spend a lot of time admiring it, mostly out of amazement that it actually existed. It was all in English, serving “sanduches” and other typical American foods, and provided free wifi for patrons. Truly, one felt as though they’d been immersed in American culture just by setting eyes on it.

Gretchen Kessler

One of the most successful (albeit kinda weirdest) immersive spaces I’ve experienced was this café just down the street from our hostel in Quito, Ecuador. It was called he “LOLCAFE,” and it was completely themed around popular internet memes. The menu was covered with all the memes they could possibly think of, and it was like looking into the heart of American youth, although we were in the middle of South America. While I never actually ate at the LOLCAFE, I did spend a lot of time admiring it, mostly out of amazement that it actually existed. It was all in English, serving “sanduches” and other typical American foods, and provided free wifi for patrons. Truly, one felt as though they’d been immersed in American culture just by setting eyes on it.

whaaat-the-funk

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10 4 / 2014

A lot of the projects that I saw at the expo were very innovative and immersive. The one that I found super innovating and immersive was a project by called Employing Airborne Integrated Multisensor Technology for Acid Mine Drainage Detection. Basically he took satellite images of the earth and compared them by using their AMD signatures. He wanted to see where coal mines are producing acid drainage and future ways to prevent this from happening by using these signatures and remote sensing. The reason this is really immersive to me is because this is what my major evolves around and something iI am able to use in my future studies. Most people wouldn’t find this very immersive. Also the way he talked about his project and his passion had me immersed.  I also think it is innovative because if we can find out where the pollution is and coming from, we are able to help out the environment and our water sources. 

Sorry for the poor quality of the photo. The lighting was bad for it and the angle the poster was at wasn’t doing it any justice. 

chelschelle

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03 4 / 2014

  1. What are some of the ways that loyalty can be developed within your space? Are there specific design practices that can be used to create forms of loyalty?  Within our space a sense of loyalty can be created by sticking to the most well known Alice in Wonderland movies.  If riders can really notice all the detail put into the attraction and how it is similar to Disney’s animated Alice in Wonderland those loyal to the movie and who like the movie will like our attraction and be loyal to it.  Beloved characters from the movie will be making appearances throughout the attraction.
  2. In terms of the spaces that you have designed (or others that other designers have created), what are some reasons why tradition did (or did not) develop in those spaces?  The reason why people like Disney rides is due to the authenticity.  Disney is tradition in itself.Alice in Wonderland is a classic Disney animated movie.  The certain characters from Alice in Wonderland like the caterpillar and the Cheshire cat are the well known recognizable characters.  Our attraction will showcase both of these characters.  By creating an attraction that riders enjoy it will create a sense of tradition of riding the ride every time they are in New Fantasyland.
  3. What are some forms of change that can’t be controlled in terms of the design of your space?  Once our ride is created the popularity or hype of the ride can decrease causing a change in popularity.  Unless Disney decides to do other remakes of the Alice in Wonderland story then we can revamp the ride updating it so it fits and hits on the latest popular Alice in Wonderland movies. 
  4. As we think about the future of designed spaces, what sorts of trends do you think will impact their design, use, and appreciation by guests?  I think attractions will have to keep using new forms of technology.  People want to be entertained and they want instant gratification.  Everyone is used to having knowledge and what they want immediately.  Attractions will have to evolve in a way that will keep the riders immersed and make them want to stay immersed.  Everyone loves sharing their experiences on social media so all attractions should start working on making that easier and more accessible.  

-Lindsay Hatcher

lindsh93

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03 4 / 2014

1. One of the most loyal fanbases in the world is composed of comic book fans. This can be a blessing and a curse. Stick too close the the source material and you’ll risk losing your larger audience, but deviate too far from it and you’ll bring down the wrath of comic book lovers everywhere. This means that in order to create loyalty, we need to include small details from the comic books and the films alike, treats for those with a larger knowledge of the Marvel Universe. It also means that we need to keep the spirit of the films in the ride. These have been so successful because of strict inter-connectivity between all of the films. We need to keep these things in mind in order to create loyalty.

2. I honestly think that tradition will be somewhat tough in our space, for the reason that the comic book world is constantly evolving and changing, with films coming out every year which change larger arching plots and which introduce and kill characters at the drop of a hat. I think the technology we’ve chosen gives us the opportunity to constantly improve and change along with the films. But I do worry that this space could suffer the same tests of time that Tomorrowland has struggled with.

3. Some forms of change that we cannot control are the films that are coming out — largely those are being pumped out by Marvel Studios and this production process (largely pre-production) is highly complex in order to ensure that continuity between the films — along with the climate of Orlando (outside of the ride, of course). To combat issues with films and continuity, it might be best to have a team working with those people making the films, or even to have the people working on the films come and help with ride development and, in future, updating.

4. I have already seen some truly amazing spaces. There are, of course, technological advancements inside rides and spaces themselves, but I think the most apparent changes are to not only the ride, but to the entire space. What I mean is that it isn’t enough to have a great ride. You now have to include thousands of tiny details and interesting tidbits in the line, in the ride cars, in every aspect leading up to and following the ride. I have two examples of some technological advancements that focus more on the overall experience rather than the attraction specifically. My first example of this is the magic mirror at Enchanted Tales with Belle. That mirror is, in all reality, a simple illusion, and not overly complicated. But the presentation, effects, and details of the space leading to the mirror create a truly magical experience. My second example is of the moving portraits in Harry Potter a Forbidden Journey. These are, in reality just TVs with a special coating to make them look like portraits. Yet the environment surrounding them makes them actually magic.  I think we will see a lot more in terms of how spaces are being designed as a whole, and the queues and setups for the rides gaining a lot more importance.

03 4 / 2014

1. What are some of the ways that loyalty can be developed within your space? Are there specific design practices that can be used to create forms of loyalty?

In our Wizard of Oz land and ride, loyalty can be developed by making sure that our attraction is always “show-ready”. Every aspect of it must fit the world and be clean and presentable. This includes the ride, buildings and especially the characters that are a part of this attraction. We want them to add to the guests experience on our attraction. We would never want a guest to not be fully immersed. The minute, that one of our guests feels out of the world we have created, they will become disloyal due to the area losing its believability. Guests are coming to this attraction because they want to be a part of the Wizard of Oz and we have to make sure that we give that to them each and every time they visit.

Specific design practices that can be used to create forms of loyalty are things such as using correct color schemes for the ride or attraction as well as making sure everything matches and works well together. Costumes, architecture, characters’ personalities. Everything must be a unit to put on the best show possible.

2. In terms of the spaces that you have designed (or others that other designers have created), what are some reasons why tradition did (or did not) develop in those spaces?

Tradition will develop in our Wizard of Oz ride/attraction because for many people, the film is a classic. Everyone knows this story and it has a special place in people’s hearts. For the older generations, they will instantly connect with this area and as for the younger kids, we hope that their older counterparts will help them along but we also know that every little girl and boy dreams to be one of the iconic characters in the film.

When it comes to affinity, as mentioned earlier, the fact that the film is a classic, the guests will already have a special place in their hearts for this ride and attraction. When they step into the land they will be swept away by their surroundings and will feel like a kid again. Inclusion is a huge part of our space because we want the guests to feel as though they are on the journey with the Wizard of Oz characters. We are creating a yellow brick road as well as interactive activities so that they can feel as though they are on the journey to Oz. We are going to blow our guests out of the water with the colors and surroundings that they will be fully immersed from the minute they step in until they leave. The commitment will definitely be there because they will want to share their experiences with others.

3. What are some forms of change that can’t be controlled in terms of the design of your space?

If the weather all of a sudden changes, we hope not permanently, our space could be affected because the majority of our attraction is outdoors and no one has ever pictured Munchkinland with a huge cold rain cloud above it.

Technology is constantly changing and if there are so many improvements in a short amount of time then our space might not be able to keep up and the guests may be bored because another new ride is using the newer technology that they desire.

People always being plugged in is a huge deal now. In order to really experience our space you must full immerse yourselves. We cannot literally remove peoples phones and such from them when they walk through the gate. If this continues to get worse, it wont only be our space that is affected. 

4. As we think about the future of designed spaces, what sorts of trends do you think will impact their design, use, and appreciation by guests?

We chose to base our space off of a classic film. Nowadays, many older films are being recreated and/or new installments are added. This is occurring currently with The Wizard of Oz. If this continues, we would have to make the decision to keep our ride based off the classic story or to keep up with the current times and update or add to our space in relation to the new movies and stories coming out. If we keep it classic I do not think that we would lose guests but if we added to it or updated it with the newer things that younger generations might appreciate I do think we could raise our numbers of guests coming to see our attraction.

-Arielle Busch

ariellebusch

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